Title Instructors Location Time Description Cross listings Fulfills Registration notes Syllabus Syllabus URL
LING 001-001 Intro To Linguistics Kathryn Dolores Schuler Martin STIT B6 MW 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Natural Science & Math Sector
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
LING 001-201 Introduction To Linguistics Oliver Henry Booker Sayeed MEYH B6 R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-202 Introduction To Linguistics Oliver Henry Booker Sayeed MEYH B6 R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-203 Introduction To Linguistics Yiran Chen TOWN 307 R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-204 Introduction To Linguistics Yiran Chen TOWN 307 R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-205 Introduction To Linguistics Milena Sereikaite WILL 205 R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-206 Introduction To Linguistics Milena Sereikaite WILL 205 R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-207 Introduction To Linguistics Nari Rhee FAGN 112 F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 001-208 Introduction To Linguistics Nari Rhee FAGN 112 F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM A general introduction to the nature, history and use of human language, speech and writing. Topics include the biological basis of human language, and analogous systems in other creatures; relations to cognition, communication, and social organization; sounds, forms and meanings in the world's languages; the reconstruction of linguistic history and the family tree of languages; dialect variation and language standardization; language and gender; language learning by children and adults; the neurology of language and language disorders; the nature and history of writing systems. Intended for any undergraduate interested in language or its use, this course is also recommended as an introduction for students who plan to major in linguistics. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 071-680 American Sign Language I Jennifer Kay Strunk WILL 214 TR 06:00 PM-07:30 PM Introduction to American Sign Language ( ASL ). Introduces ASL in a contextualized and conversational manner. Course includes receptive and expressive readiness activities, sign vocabulary and grammar, and an introduction to important topics and people within Deaf communities and Deaf culture.
LING 071-681 American Sign Language I Melanie Drolsbaugh WILL 24 MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Introduction to American Sign Language ( ASL ). Introduces ASL in a contextualized and conversational manner. Course includes receptive and expressive readiness activities, sign vocabulary and grammar, and an introduction to important topics and people within Deaf communities and Deaf culture.
LING 071-682 American Sign Language I Jami N. Fisher WILL 215 MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM Introduction to American Sign Language ( ASL ). Introduces ASL in a contextualized and conversational manner. Course includes receptive and expressive readiness activities, sign vocabulary and grammar, and an introduction to important topics and people within Deaf communities and Deaf culture. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020A&course=LING071682
LING 072-680 Amer Sign Language II Melanie Drolsbaugh WILL 27 MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM Increased communication skill in American Sign Language (ASL). Expressive and receptive abilities are expanded upon via a contextualized and conversational manner Important topics to Deaf communities and Deaf culture are continued within online and in-class discussion. Penn Language Center Permission Needed
Prior Language Experience Required
LING 072-681 Amer Sign Language II Melanie Drolsbaugh WILL 214 TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Increased communication skill in American Sign Language (ASL). Expressive and receptive abilities are expanded upon via a contextualized and conversational manner Important topics to Deaf communities and Deaf culture are continued within online and in-class discussion. Penn Language Center Permission Needed
Prior Language Experience Required
LING 072-682 Amer Sign Language II Sarah Ruth WILL 24 MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM Increased communication skill in American Sign Language (ASL). Expressive and receptive abilities are expanded upon via a contextualized and conversational manner Important topics to Deaf communities and Deaf culture are continued within online and in-class discussion. Penn Language Center Permission Needed
Prior Language Experience Required
LING 072-683 Amer Sign Language II Kaitlyn Parenti WILL 203 TR 06:00 PM-07:30 PM Increased communication skill in American Sign Language (ASL). Expressive and receptive abilities are expanded upon via a contextualized and conversational manner Important topics to Deaf communities and Deaf culture are continued within online and in-class discussion.
LING 073-680 Amer Sign Language III Joshua Beckman WILL 24 MW 06:30 PM-08:00 PM American Sign Language (ASL) at the Intermediate I level. Expressive and receptive abilities are expanded upon via a contextualized and conversational manner, including, but not limited to, narrative production. Important topics to Deaf communities and Deaf culture are continued within online and in-class discussion. Penn Language Center Permission Needed
Prior Language Experience Required
LING 074-680 Amer Sign Language IV Christy Hennessey WILL 216 TR 06:00 PM-07:30 PM American Sign Language (ASL) at the Intermediate II level. Expressive and receptive abilities are expanded upon via a contextualized and conversational manner, including, but not limited to, narrative production. Important topics to Deaf communities and Deaf culture are continued within online and in-class discussion. Penn Language Center Permission Needed
Prior Language Experience Required
LING 074-681 Amer Sign Language IV: Asl Iv - Medical Christy Hennessey WILL 214 TR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM American Sign Language (ASL) at the Intermediate II level. Expressive and receptive abilities are expanded upon via a contextualized and conversational manner, including, but not limited to, narrative production. Important topics to Deaf communities and Deaf culture are continued within online and in-class discussion. Penn Language Center Permission Needed
Prior Language Experience Required
LING 074-682 Amer Sign Language IV Joshua Beckman WILL 214 MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM American Sign Language (ASL) at the Intermediate II level. Expressive and receptive abilities are expanded upon via a contextualized and conversational manner, including, but not limited to, narrative production. Important topics to Deaf communities and Deaf culture are continued within online and in-class discussion. Penn Language Center Permission Needed
Prior Language Experience Required
LING 078-680 Deaf Culture Jami N. Fisher BENN 222 TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course is an advanced/conversational ASL course that explores several key topics related to Deaf Culture. Using only ASL in class, students will read and discuss books, articles, and films related to the following topics: Deaf History, Deaf Identity, Deafness as Asset, Communication Issues and Pathological Perspectives on Deafness, Deafness and Education, Deaf/Hearing Family Dynamics. Language growth will stem from direct instruction as well as through the course of class conversation. Students will collaborate with the instructor and our Deaf community liaison to develop and host an event that is accessible to both Deaf and hearing people alike. Cultural Diversity in the US Penn Language Center Permission Needed
An Academically Based Community Serv Course
Prior Language Experience Required
LING 082-680 Beg Irish Gaelic II Roslyn Blyn-Ladrew WILL 28 MW 05:00 PM-07:00 PM
LING 084-680 Interm Irish Gaelic II Roslyn Blyn-Ladrew MW 07:00 PM-08:30 PM A continuation of Elementary Irish Gaelic with increasing emphasis on the native idiom and literary forms. Drama texts and poetry will be used to supplement the grammar component and encourage oral proficiency, while simultaneously providing an understanding of the challenges faced by contemporary authors writing in Irish.
LING 102-001 Intro To Socioling Meredith J Tamminga DRLB A5 MW 01:00 PM-02:00 PM Human language viewed from a social and historical perspective. Students will acquire the tools of linguistic analysis through interactive computer programs, covering phonetics, phonology and morphology, in English and other languages. These techniques will then be used to trace social differences in the use of language, and changing patterns of social stratification. The course will focus on linguistic changes in progress in American society, in both mainstream and minority communities, and the social problems associated with them. Students will engage in field projects to search for the social correlates of linguistic behavior, and use quantitative methods to analyze the results. College Quantitative Data Analysis Req.
Society Sector
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Structured,Active,In-Class Learning
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
LING 102-201 Introduction To Sociolinguistics Yosiane Zenobia White WILL 5 R 09:30 AM-10:30 AM Human language viewed from a social and historical perspective. Students will acquire the tools of linguistic analysis through interactive computer programs, covering phonetics, phonology and morphology, in English and other languages. These techniques will then be used to trace social differences in the use of language, and changing patterns of social stratification. The course will focus on linguistic changes in progress in American society, in both mainstream and minority communities, and the social problems associated with them. Students will engage in field projects to search for the social correlates of linguistic behavior, and use quantitative methods to analyze the results. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 102-202 Introduction To Sociolinguistics Yosiane Zenobia White WILL 5 R 10:30 AM-11:30 AM Human language viewed from a social and historical perspective. Students will acquire the tools of linguistic analysis through interactive computer programs, covering phonetics, phonology and morphology, in English and other languages. These techniques will then be used to trace social differences in the use of language, and changing patterns of social stratification. The course will focus on linguistic changes in progress in American society, in both mainstream and minority communities, and the social problems associated with them. Students will engage in field projects to search for the social correlates of linguistic behavior, and use quantitative methods to analyze the results. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 102-203 Introduction To Sociolinguistics Eleftherios Paparounas WILL 216 F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM Human language viewed from a social and historical perspective. Students will acquire the tools of linguistic analysis through interactive computer programs, covering phonetics, phonology and morphology, in English and other languages. These techniques will then be used to trace social differences in the use of language, and changing patterns of social stratification. The course will focus on linguistic changes in progress in American society, in both mainstream and minority communities, and the social problems associated with them. Students will engage in field projects to search for the social correlates of linguistic behavior, and use quantitative methods to analyze the results. Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
LING 106-001 Intro To Formal Ling Florian Schwarz DRLB A5 MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM In this course, we study formal mathematical tools for the analysis of language that help us understand and classify the complex structures and rules that constitute language and grammar. These tools include set theory, formal language and automata theory, as well as aspects of logic, and will be applied to the syntax and semantics of natural language. In addition to learning something about formal tools for analyzing language, this will also enhance your general skills in analytical reasoning. Formal Reasoning Course Structured,Active,In-Class Learning
LING 151-401 Language and Thought John C. Trueswell LLAB 10 TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course describes current theorizing on how the human mind achieves high-level cognitive processes such as using language, thinking, and reasoning. The course discusses issues such as whether the language ability is unique to humans, whether there is a critical period to the acquisition of a language, the nature of conceptual knowledge, how people perform deductive reasoning and induction, and how linguistic and conceptual knowledge interact. PSYC151401
LING 210-001 Intro To Language Change Donald A Ringe BENN 20 TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course covers the principles of language change and the methods of historical linguistics on an elementary level. The systematic regularity of change, the reasons for that regularity, and the exploitation of regularity in linguistic reconstruction are especially emphasized. Examples are drawn from a wide variety of languages, both familiar and unfamiliar. The prerequisite for the course is any course in phonetics or phonology, or Ling 001, or permission of the instructor. Note that this course does NOT satisfy any sector requirement.
LING 230-401 Sound Structure of Lang Rolf Noyer WILL 5 MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM An introduction to phonetics and phonology. Topics include articulatory phonetics (the anatomy of the vocal tract; how speech sounds are produced); transcription (conventions for representing the sounds of the world's languages); classification (how speech sounds are classified and represented cognitively through distinctive features); phonology (the grammar of speech sounds in various languages: their patterning and interaction) and syllable structure and its role in phonology. Prerequisite: A prior course in linguistics or permission of instructor. LING503401
LING 241-001 Lang in Native America Eugene Buckley WILL 218 MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM This course is an introduction to linguistic perspectives on the languages native to the Americas (their nature and distribution, typological similarities and differences), with an emphasis on North America. The diverse languages of this region will be examined from the point of view of particular linguistic phenomena, such as phonology, morphology, and syntax; and in addition we will study their historical development and their place in culture, society, and thought.
LING 247-001 Structure of Asl Jami N. Fisher
Beatrice Santorini
BENN 201 TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course covers the linguistic structure of American Sign Language (ASL), including its phonology (articulatory features, phonological constraints, nonmanuals), morphology (morphological constraints, compounds, incorporation, borrowing), and syntax (syntactic categories, basic phrase structure, common sentence types), Also discussed are the topics of classifiers and deixis. In keeping with the comparative perspective of linguistic theory, parallels and differences between ASL and other (primarily spoken) languages are pointed out where appropriate. Historical and sociolinguistic issues are addressed where they are relevant to elucidating linguistic structure. Though the course focuses on ASL, it necessarily touches on issues concerning sign languages more generally, notably the possible effects of modality (sign vs. speech) on linguistic structure and the implications of the signed modality for general linguistics. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2020A&course=LING247001
LING 338-001 Morphosyntax in Use Anthony S Kroch MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM Linguistics 338 investigates how quantitative methods can be combined with grammatical analysis to improve our understanding of how speaker deploy their knowledge of morphosyntactic features of their language. In the course of the semester students learn to carry out research on usage data from various varieties of English. The academic requirements for the course will consist of bi-weekly, data based assignments on the linguistic phenomenon under discussion under each course topic. The details of the assignments will be worked out through class discussion.
LING 455-301 Exps Study of Meaning Anna Papafragou WLNT 300C TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM This course provides an introduction to the experimental study of meaning in natural language. We begin by introducing some basic notions of formal semantics and pragmatics and review relevant technical background. Next we discuss recent developments in studying meaning-related phenomena experimentally, which, in addition to theoretical questions, involve issues in the acquisition and processing of semantic information. In the course of this, we will also introduce the basics of experimental design and relevant psycholinguistic methodology. In addition to readings and homework assignments, students will embark on a small research project (individually or jointly), which will be presented in class at the end of the semester and written up as a term paper.
LING 496-001 Agents and Evolution Robin L. Clark BENN 322 TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM The course surveys Evolutionary Game Theory and Agent-Based Models with special reference to language. We will develop systems for modeling various types of language change as well as the dynamics of linguistic micro-variation. Topics include semantic/pragmatic cycles in signaling, the maintenance of conventional meaning, and testing for selection in language change. Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 503-401 Sound Structure of Lang Rolf Noyer WILL 5 MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM An introduction to articulatory and acoustic phonetics; phonetic transcription; basic concepts and methods of phonological analysis. LING230401 Undergraduates Need Permission
LING 511-001 Lang Variation & Change Meredith J Tamminga WLNT 300C MW 02:30 PM-04:00 PM Speech communities as a focus for the understanding of language evolution and change: language variation in time and space. The relationship between language structure and language use; between language change and social change. Populations as differentiated by age, sex, social class, race, and ethnicity, and the relationship of these factors to linguistic differentiation. Undergraduates Need Permission
LING 521-001 Phonetics II Mark Yoffe Liberman MW 09:00 AM-10:30 AM This is a methodology course, which focuses on how to conduct phonetics research using very large speech corpora. Topics include scripting and statistical techniques, automatic phonetic analysis, integration of speech technology in phonetics studies, variation and invariability in large speech corpora, and revisiting classic phonetic and phonological problems from the perspective of corpus phonetics. Undergraduates Need Permission
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 525-001 Biol Signals & Systems Mark Yoffe Liberman WLNT 300C
WLNT 300C
M 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
F 10:00 AM-12:00 PM
A hands-on signal and image processing course for non-EE graduate students needing these skills. We will go through all the fundamentals of signal and image processing using computer exercises developed in MATLAB. Examples will be drawn from speech analysis and synthesis, computer vision, and biological modeling. Undergraduates Need Permission
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 531-001 Phonology II Eugene Buckley WLNT 300C TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM Second half of a year-long introduction; continues LING 530. Topics to be surveyed include syllable structure and moraic theory; the prosodic hierarchy; the properties and representation of geminates; templatic and prosodic morphology; reduplication and emergence of the unmarked; and metrical phonology (properties of stress, foot typology, and issues of constituency). Emphasizes hands-on analysis of a wide range of data. Undergraduates Need Permission
LING 551-001 Syntax II WLNT 300C TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM The second half of a year-long introduction to the formal study of natural language syntax. Topics to be covered include grammatical architecture; derivational versus representational statement of syntactic principles; movement and locality; the interface of syntax and semantics; argument structure; and other topics. The emphasis is on reading primary literature and discussing theoretical approaches, along with detailed case-studies of specific syntactic phenomena in different languages. Undergraduates Need Permission
LING 556-301 Historical Syntax Anthony S Kroch M 12:00 PM-02:00 PM Introduction to the study of the syntax of languages attested only in historical corpora. The course will cover methods and results in the grammatical description of such languages and in the diachronic study of syntactic change. Undergraduates Need Permission
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 575-001 Mental Lexicon David Scott Embick WLNT 300C TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM An investigation of the psychological representations and processing of words. Topics include: the extraction of words from speech; lexical access and production; the induction of morphological and phonological regularities in word learning; decomposition of morphologically complex words; frequency effects in morphological processing; storage vs. computation in the lexicon; the past tense debate; morphological change. This course makes extensive use of linguistic corpora. Students will also be familiarized with experimental design issues in the psycholinguistic study of the lexicon. Undergraduates Need Permission
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 610-301 Tocharian Donald A Ringe BENN 140 W 11:00 AM-02:00 PM Selected topics either in Indo-European comparative linguistics or in historical and comparative method. Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 620-301 Topics in Phonetics Jianjing Kuang WLNT 300C M 12:00 PM-02:00 PM Topics in Phonetics Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 650-301 Topics in Natl Lang Synt Julie Legate WLNT 300C W 12:00 PM-02:00 PM Detailed study of topics in syntax and semantics, e.g., pronominalization, negation, complementation. Topics vary from term to term. Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 675-401 Language and Cognition John C. Trueswell
Anna Papafragou
WLNT 300C W 09:00 AM-12:00 PM This is a seminar on how language relates to perception and cognition. The seminar pays particular attention to the question of whether and how language might affect (and be affected by) other mental processes, how different languages represent the mental and physical world, and how children acquire language-general and language-specific ways of encoding human experience. The course incorporates cross-linguistic, cognitive and developmental perspectives on a new and rapidly changing research area. PSYC675401 Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
LING 990-007 Masters Thesis Donald A Ringe